John Senex

Birth: 1678

Death:1740

John Senex (1678, Ludlow, Shropshire - died 1740, London) was an English cartographer, engraver and explorer. He owned a business on Fleet Street, where he sold maps. He was one of the principal cartographers of the 18th century. He started his apprenticeship with Robert Clavell, at the Stationers Company, in 1692. Senex is famous for his maps of the world, some of which have added elevations, and which feature minuscule detailed engravings.

Having worked and collaborated with Charles Price, Senex created a series of engravings for the London Almanacs and in 1714 he published together with Maxwell an English Atlas. In 1719 he published a miniature edition of Brittania by Ogilby. In 1721 he published a new general atlas. He used the work of cartographer Guillaume de L’Isle as an influence. In 1728 Senex was elected into the Fellowship of the Royal Society of London.

References:

Worms, Laurence. "Senex, John". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press.

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